Investing in Problem-Solving, Not Product: PureTech’s “Proactive” Approach

PureTech Health (PRNewsFoto/PureTech Health)

Step into the sixth floor offices of PureTech Health in downtown Boston and you may feel that you’ve dropped into a rabbit hole and right into a lush wonderland of wall-to-wall greenery. It’s a surprising interior for the otherwise nondescript office building on the heavily trafficked Boylston Street.

But the unique décor might provide a clue about how this innovative company, run by CEO Daphne Zohar, operates. Referred to as an intellectual property (IP) commercialization company, one of a rare breed seen in the U.S., it licenses and develops health tech and life sciences patents from academic and independently-run labs. The model is common in the U.K.–PureTech Health went public on the London Stock Exchange this past May, raising nearly $200 million—but is radically different from how typical biopharma or venture capital firms operate.

“We start with the problem–take obesity or other disorders, like schizophrenia, ADHD–where we feel like there really isn’t a very good way to address it, and we bring together a network of 50 plus experts from around the globe, people who have really thought deeply about this problem and others who may be in slightly different disciplines,” explains Julie DiCarlo, PureTech’s SVP of Communciations and Investor Relations. “They look at the problem from different perspectives and start vetting potential technologies or science to address it. So it’s really different than a company that might say, ‘Here’s a really cool technology that we want to invest in.’”

After the think tank identifies potentially useful innovations, PureTech tests the concepts to see if previously reported results are reproducible. DiCarlo adds, “From there, we might find that there’s one that really stands out as a really potentially exciting and game-changing opportunity and if it passes all of our rigorous tests, we’ll start a company around it.”

This process of search and discovery has lead to the founding of some of the most innovative healthcare-focused companies, with diverse treatments ranging from drugs and biologics, to devices and digital health.

Akili Interactive Labs develops video game therapies for treating cognitive disorders, which have been found to improve cognitive ability and executive function among the elderly. In the future, Akili hopes to also develop treatments for those suffering from disorders like ADHD, autism and depression.

Vedanta Biosciences hopes to treat autoimmune and infectious diseases by modulating a patient’s microbiome. At this stage, Vedanta is isolating specific strains of organisms in order to learn which combinations result in particular, desired phenotypic expressions and outcomes.

Gelesis has developed an oral hydrogel capsule for the treatment of obesity (and related disorders, such as diabetes) which works mechanically, causing early satiety and decreased appetite, before dissolving and being eliminated by the body.

Tal Medical is working on a tabletop medical device (modeled like a much smaller MRI machine) that has been shown to rapidly reverse depression through neurostimulation. A single treatment with the device has been found to have an effect equal to four to six weeks of traditional pharmacologic treatment.

PureTech has 12 companies currently in their portfolio with a goal to add an additional one to two each year. Although each is independently-run, they are all majority-owned by PureTech, sometimes for the long-term. This approach allows for more flexibility than at a typical life sciences or VC firm. These companies have the potential to become completely independent, be sold to larger biopharmas, develop partnerships with other healthcare organizations, or may be retained by PureTech to continue growing the company’s product lines.

Executive Vice President of Science and Technology Erik Elenko calls PureTech’s approach “100 percent proactive.” “Think about a typical entrepreneur who has one technology and they [sic] get really excited about it but there could be 10 others out there. We’re reaching out to people, we’re not having companies come and pitch us…The key is that you start with a problem and come up with a solution, rather than investing in a technology which may or not be useful.”

The company also draws on a large, interdisciplinary panel of experts—including outside experts in addition to members of its own scientific advisory board—who look at complex healthcare problems from a multitude of angles. Among the most valuable and in-demand consultants are those working in digital health. According to Elenko, healthcare and IT have radically different cultures and “different ways of approaching the world,” so finding individuals that have connections in both worlds is invaluable in solving today’s complex healthcare challenges.

PureTech has ambitious plans for the future.

“If you look at our fundamental goal, it’s to solve the most difficult healthcare problems that exist through interdisciplinary and unexpected solutions,” shared Elenko. “Success is getting therapies to market for patients, reaching more patients through partners and helping patients by looking at their toughest problems.”

This article was originally published on MedTech Boston.


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